When giving treatments when do you know that you have given enough time for it to work
Asked by andys
Report

7 answers

Top answer
WestLondonColonics
I am Julia Rhodes, principal colon hydro therapist with West London Colonics.
WLC Wahanda page: http://www.wahanda.com/place/west-london-colonics/
With colon hydrotherapy, the answer falls into 2 stages:
A) Pre colonic preparation
Preparation with hydration is key.
A lot of bowel dysfunction is aggravated (if not caused) by poor levels of hydration (too little water intake) and too much of the wrong sort of liquids (coffee fizzy drinks, alcohol). The prime instruction I give to clients is to drink more water for 3 to 4 days before the colonic. It’s not the only instruction, but it’s the main one.
B) During the session, there’s the split between on table colonics time, and other time. In a typical hour-long session, about 35-to40 min is ample for the former. The therapeutic action is obvious. People typically report feeling good after. The feelgood factor can extends well beyond the session, sometimes for a month or two.
Search Treatwell for Ladies' Waxing near you
Rebecca Urban Oasis
You would have your specified times for each treatment that you offer but if you ever feel that the client needs more of your time then do so. Trust your intuition but don't do it where your not leaving yourself enough time for the next client.
Toccobeauty
All beauty therapy treatments have recommended times eg manicure 30mins however if the condition of the cuticles are poor then you would allow more time on this and cut back on the massagethis would need to be dicussed with client when preparing a treatment plan
MichelleZelli
We expand all tasks and creativity into the time we have allocated. It is worth working in the reverse, decide what you want your client to experience and what you will need to do in order to provide this, how long does that take?
I use 90 minutes for a session. 30 minutes to review the previous week or two since the last session, 45 minutes to work with transformation tools and the final 15 minutes to discuss what the client has learned and experienced and how they are going to move forward through the coming period until their next session or the event they are preparing for.
michaeljames
Hi andys, if you don't know the answer then I suggest you stop practicing immediately and go back to college for retraining.
All the best.
Love-is
Hi Andy,
What treatment are you referring to?
Georgia
An NLP Practitioner is trained to look for physiological changes in a person - things like rate of breathing, complexion of face, tone of voice etc, and these are the first signs that a person is processing or about to make a significant change.
This kind of change happens in a matter of minutes - a sudden realisation, or a decision rest on a pivotal point. It may take a while to make the changes in life to reflect that decision, but the decision itself is instant and an experienced practitioner can spot the many signs.
Also, a person who makes a big change to their perception or understanding will suddenly very much want to tell you about it, and again the way someone speaks and the words they use are indicative that a shift has taken place. In NLP and Hypnotherapy, that's the end of the practitioner's job.
The client comes to get some help with making a change in outlook, feelings or outcome and the practitioner helps that person to find the resources they need (strength, determination, security, peace) to make the change. It's literally like a light bulb moment, or often quite a few light bulb moments in a row. Integrating the change into their own life is something the client can do best themselves.
So I expect a client to achieve this sort of personal change in two to three appointments, then s/he gets to take it away and build on it.
Making good use of a big change like this is an ongoing process. You get instant change in how you feel/think and want to do things, then you start to use that in your life and build on it. and I would expect someone to continue to integrate the changes over six months to a year, maybe more.
I've added a link to the fears and phobias page of my website below, as it explains the change process a little more.
Have a great day,
Georgia